Your creative brief can set the general direction for your content creation and, for some content types (batches of tweets, low priority website pages, for example), it can provide all the guidance your contributors need. Other types of content need a more targeted approach.

Blog posts or copy for key landing pages, for example, will be going head-to-head with content that’s already out there trying to serve the same needs and reach the same audience. To be truly competitive these types of content needs their own bespoke, article-level strategy.

We use a process we call Content Mapping, firstly to find gaps in what’s currently available on a given topic and then to pick the specific tactics that will make our piece more valuable to search engines and to users.

What is Content Mapping?

Content Mapping is our process for ensuring that critical editorial content is genuinely competitive. It identifies search terms that have the right user intent but aren’t being well-served by the existing results. And it highlights the specific tactics we can employ to create something that does a better job.

What you get with Content Mapping is a strategy for each individual piece of content. With so much content already out there, whatever topic you’re writing about, it takes this sort of approach to cut through the noise. Blogs and landing pages supported by Content Mapping offer superior value to users. Because of that they have a longer shelf-life in search and can better drive your social media and email campaigns.

Do I need Content Mapping for all of my content?

Not if you’re writing 500 product descriptions or a new bio for your Facebook Page. You should use it for your more competitive content, such as your blog or your search landing pages.